Plaster Casts

The Wilcox Collection

Apollo Belvedere

Lippincott Hall

Modern plaster replica of a Roman marble copy of a Greek bronze original of ca. 330 BCE, usually associated with the sculptor Leochares. Most scholars, however, now believe he is a Roman re-creation or adaptation in Greek style and date him to 130-140 CE, around the time of the emperor Hadrian (ruled 117-138).

Dancing Satyr or Faun

Lippincott Hall

Modern plaster replica of Roman bronze original from the House of the Faun at Pompeii, dating ca. 150 BCE. According to the small metal oval in the underside of the base, the cast was purchased from the Caproni Bros. cast company of Boston probably in 1885.

Venus Milo

Lippincott Hall

Modern plaster replica of the Greek marble original of ca. 150 BCE now located in the Louvre Museum, Paris. The cast was made in London by D. Brucciani & Co. (founded by Domenico Brucciani in 1864) according to a large metal plate in the front of the base. The cast was purchased by Professor Wilcox in 1885 -- it is one of the five original casts when the collection was dedicated in 1888.

Head of Hadrian

Lippincott Hall

Hadrian (born 76, ruled 117-138 CE). Hadrian's reign was fairly peaceful, mainly because he withdrew troops from eastern and northern provinces. To ensure the peace, he traveled to nearly every province. He is well known for his Hellenism, his affair with the youth Antinoƶs, and the Pantheon in Rome and villa at Tivoli. He forbade circumcision by the Jews which led to the Bar Kochba revolt (132-35), which he ruthlessly suppressed; his Roman colony, Aelia Capitolina, in Jerusalem and his fortification of Temple Mount has made Hadrian a pariah amongst Jews.

Nike of Samothrace

Lippincott Hall

Modern plaster replica (given to the Wilcox by the KU Department of French and Italian) at a about 1/2 scale of a Greek original of ca. 190 BCE (original is just over 8 ft tall). According to the small metal oval in the back, the cast was purchased from the Caproni Bros. cast company of Boston probably in 1885.

Homer

Lippincott Hall

Modern plaster replica of a late Hellenistic work of ca. 100 BCE. One of several totally imaginative portraits of the blind poet, supposedly from the islad of Chios, who presumably lived and worked in the late 8th century BCE. Homer was said to have composed the Iliad and the Odyssey orally and then to have written them down with the advent of writing. In fact, Homer was in a line of bards in a tradition of oral recitation that stretched from the Mycenaean era of the 13th/12th centuries BCE into the 7th century BCE. One well-preserved Roman copy of this version of the Homer portrait is in the National Archaeological Museum in Naples.